Posts Tagged ‘BBA Challenge’

BBA Challenge – Cinnamon Buns

YUMMY!

mise en place!  Egg not pictured.  I took this waiting for husband to get home from the grocery store with eggs!

mise en place! Egg not pictured. I took this waiting for husband to get home from the grocery store with eggs!

 

butter, sugar, buttermilk powder & salt creamed together

butter, sugar, buttermilk powder & salt creamed together

 

kneading with the help of my kitchenaid mixer

kneading with the help of my kitchenaid mixer

 

ladies and gentleman - i give you the window pane!

ladies and gentleman - i give you the window pane!

 

the dough is a balmy 81 degrees

the dough is a balmy 80.4 degrees

 

sticky bun glaze - butter, sugar, brown sugar, salt & corn syrup

sticky bun glaze - butter, sugar, brown sugar, salt & corn syrup

 

glaze & toasted pecans

glaze & toasted pecans

 

cinnamon and sugar spread over the dough

cinnamon and sugar spread over the dough

all rolled up and ready to be cut into rolls

all rolled up and ready to be cut into rolls

rolls ready to be parked in the refrigerator over night

rolls ready to be parked in the refrigerator over night

my husband was kind enough to take them out at 5:20am.  At 9am they were warmed up, proofed & ready for the oven.

my husband was kind enough to take them out at 5:20am. At 9am they were warmed up, proofed & ready for the oven.

halfway through the 25 minutes in the oven

halfway through the 25 minutes in the oven

out of the oven and ready to be flipped

out of the oven and ready to be flipped

drooooooooool

drooooooooool

looks delicious at any angle

looks delicious at any angle

my masterpiece! (and my breakfast)

my masterpiece! (and my breakfast)

crumb shot!  check out that swirl.

crumb shot! check out that swirl.


BBA Challenge – Ciabatta

I have a love-hate relationship with this bread.  The first time I made it, I used Peter Reinhart’s Poolish starter.  The bread had a very tight crumb.  Good flavor but definitely bared no resemblance to ciabatta.  Refusing to accept defeat, I made the bread again, this time using the Biga starter, max hydration and the optional olive oil.  I also elected to sprinkle freshly grated asiago onto the dough during the two stretch and fold manuevers.  The dough was super sticky and nothing like any of the doughs I had worked with so far in this challenge, so I figured I must have finally gotten it right.  I was extra careful with the dough, trying as hard as I  could not to let any of the gasses escape.  I was extremely confident that this time I had it right. 

When I checked on the loaves half way through baking, they were massive!  They ballooned in the oven.   My confidence in this bread had started to wane.  The bottoms were done, but the top wasn’t nearly as browned as I would have liked – but I pulled the loaves because I hate burned bread bottoms.  After an hour on the cooking rack, I cut into the first loaf.  It wasn’t what I expected.  The crumb was too tight, but the slice was very light and had a nice flavor.  I was mad.  I started cursing the ciabatta.  I went onto twitter and complained about my failure. 

Then came dinner.  My husband and I decided to have sandwiches.  I started slicing the ciabatta and low and behold – by the second slice in I had holes!  I immediately tweeted by appologies to the ciabatta and then enjoyed a salami sandwich.  Up next is either cinnamon rolls or sticky buns.  I haven’t decided which.  Maybe I’ll split the dough in half and make both.


BBA Challenge – Challah

Peter Reinhart goes into detail about how to make a traditional braided challah, but much like the Artos and Casatiello formulas, it was going to make an enormous loaf.  I opted to make 2 oz rolls instead.  I think next time I would make 4 oz rolls – which would be the optimal hamburger bun or sandwich size.  The 2 oz rolls would make smaller sandwiches or decent sized dinner rolls.  If you wanted to use these for sliders, I would go 1.5 oz.  I found instructions to shaped “festive knot rolls” from The Secret of Challah.  I would definitely make this challah again.  It rose like a champ, was very easy to work with and tastes fantastic. 


BBA Challenge – Casatiello

Casatiello is an Italian cousin to Brioche.  Like a savory panetone.  Peter Reinhart even mentions that you can bake the casatiello in panetone molds.  I looked online and found that the panetone molds were kind of on the pricey side (even for me…  the girl who will buy anything baking related even if I only use it once).  So I decided to make my own.  I am a pretty big fan of origami boxes, so I adapted one to suit my needs.  I made a base out of brown shipping paper, and an insert made from parchment.  I was quite happy with the results.  I spent a solid 30 minutes telling my husband how much of a genius I am because I was able to combine my love of origami, photography and baking all into one project. 

In keeping with my trend of sharing the bread with family/friends/coworkers, I made 4 individual loaves each in its own origami panetone form.  This casatiello has sopresetta (salami), sharp provolone and aged asiago.  Husband really enjoyed the bread.  I loved the sopresetta.  Once it is lightly sauteed the flavor really comes out.  The origami really held up.  I was quite excited.